Growing Gardeners, Building Sovereignty

Episode 5 September 25, 2020 00:08:25
Growing
Food Revolution
Growing Gardeners, Building Sovereignty
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Show Notes

Anpetu waste! In this episode of Food Revolution, you'll hear from three of the Food Sovereignty Initiative's returning summer garden interns: Maddie Kornely, Keshena One Star, and Mikey Boyd. They'll share what food sovereignty means to them, talk about some of the experiences they've had up at the garden, and discuss why they chose to come back this summer. The future of food sovereignty lies with our youth, and seeing the excitement and passion this group of interns brought to the garden this summer has us hopeful for the years to come. Be sure to tune in to future episodes to hear from the rest of the summer garden team! 

Show notes & transcription available here.

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Enjoy listening to Food Revolution? Consider donating to the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative to help us in our mission to build food sovereignty and a local foods economy to empower our tribal community through food! Donations are 501(c)3 tax deductible. 

Website: www.sicangucdc.org

Facebook: Sicangu Community Development Corporation

Instagram: @sicangucdc

Twitter: @sicangucdc

YouTube: Sicangu Community Development Corporation

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Maddie (00:00:00) Food sovereignty, to me, is... freedom. I feel like everybody should be able to grow their own food and have that information, have that knowledge to be able to do it. And once we hit that step where either you can buy all of it locally or you're growing your own food, I feel like that's the ultimate goal for everyone. It’s important as a people to be able to do that.  

(Intro) Hau Mitakuyapi, and welcome to Food Revolution, brought to you by the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and tribal food producers working to build a more just, equitable, and regenerative food system for our Sicangu Lakota Oyate - the Burnt Thigh Nation. Together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we've set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be part of the Food Revolution.

Mairi: Anpetu waste. I'm Mairi Creeden, the media coordinator for the Food Sovereignty Initiative and the producer of Food Revolution. Today on the show, you'll be hearing from three of our summer garden interns and community members, Maddie Kornely, Keshena One Star, and Mikey Boyd. They'll share what food sovereignty means to them, talk about some of the experiences they've had up at the garden, and discuss why they chose to come back this summer. The future of food sovereignty lies with our youth, and seeing the excitement and passion this group of interns brought to the garden this summer has left us hopeful for the years to come. Be sure to tune in to future episodes to hear from the rest of the summer garden team.  

Maddie (00:01:41) My name is Maddie Kornely, I'm from the Mission/Antelope area. My parents are from here, they work in the school district and I live in teacher housing. Well, I did originally apply last year, but, something didn't work out. So I was really happy that they asked again this year if I wanted to do it, and I was able to get my application in and do it again because I love working out here. I just really like putting in hard work in the morning and being outside with plants. And yeah, I like seeing all of the vegetables grow, flowers blossom that we plant, but I also like the team building aspect of it, getting to know everybody better throughout the summer and getting really close as a team. 

Oh, there's a lot of things different now. There's so many things that we do now that we didn't do, because the first year I was here, we were kind of building up the garden, getting it ready to be able to do all the things we do now.  Like to be able to have the chickens here, to be able to have so many things growing in the indigenous garden and having every part of the acre that we use, be useful in some type of way. A lot of things, today in particular, I learned how to catch chickens and, uh, I guess transport them. And I've learned about a lot of new vegetables that I've never heard about before. Um, one thing I've really enjoyed my first year was learning about composting and, um, the whole process of it. Food sovereignty, to me, is freedom. I feel like everybody should be able to grow their own food and have that information, have that knowledge to be able to do it. And once we hit that step where either you can buy all local or you're growing your own food, I feel like that's like the ultimate goal for every one. It’s important as a people to be able to do that.  

(00:03:52) I think one of the most important things that I've learned from this job, and it's not necessarily something that I've learned this year, but my first year here, was how to work with so many people in so many different types of things we do. Like we all dig dirt and move it together. We all weed together. We all do everything together, but it's all, I was never really a team person before I started. I learned how to do that here. Well, right now I I'm still at school. I’m getting a degree in political science, but I've been thinking about going into, um, education possibly. Doing this program has definitely made me want to do something that can help my community kind of more straight forward than I originally thought.

Keshena (00:05:02) I’m Keshena One Star, I’m from Antelope. 

(Why did you decide to come back to the garden this summer?) 

Just being able to help my community. It was one of the reasons. And also just, um, I like being in the garden, being around nature.

(How is this year different from years past?) 

 It’s way hotter. There’s a lot more, um, a lot more work to be done, but it's not as hard as it was the first year, because I think my body has kind of gotten used to working really hard. 

(What will you take with you?) 

Definitely all the knowledge I learned up here in the garden. Um, a lot of the Lakota values are really incorporated here. So I think those are really what will stick with me.

(What are your plans after this internship, and what’s your favorite thing about being in the garden?)

Probably going to start my own garden. Um, fresh air, uh, nature bugs. 

Mikey (00:06:02) I’m Mikey Boyd, I’m from Antelope, and I'm here doing a summer VISTA internship on my third summer. I just really enjoy it. I think it's really awesome work. And I really like what we're trying to do for the community. And it's nice to have a decent paying job in the summer that also does some good stuff. We keep expanding and keep getting like new things and keep planting new things. Um, like my first summer here, it was like we just started on the tomatoes, but it was mostly into the indigenous garden. I think we had just started with the indigenous garden and now we have like chickens and all this. So it's cool.

(What do you like most about being in the garden?)

I guess like working with other people, um, generally, all the jobs I've had have been very isolated by myself, but this requires a lot of communication and working with other people. So, and also just like some basic gardening stuff, the stuff that I pick up on.  

(What does food sovereignty mean to you?) 

(00:06:56) For me, it means independence and being able to kind of create a sustainable food system. So self-sufficiency away from, you know, the government, if you need to. 

(What’s your biggest takeaway from your time up in the garden?) 

My biggest takeaway? That we need more stuff like this here. More stuff that kind of emphasizes self sufficiency and building up the community. I think that's a good thing. There's really good stuff going on here. It's very easy to get a little bit depressed about living here sometimes with the situation, but, stuff like this and knowing that our community members are a lot of the people that are leading it is really an awesome thing. So if we can do this, we can do a lot more.  

Mairi (00:07:49) Thanks for tuning in to this episode of Food Revolution from the Sicangu Food Sovereignty Initiative. Don't forget to follow us on Facebook at the Sicangu Community Development Corporation, Instagram and Twitter @sicangucdc, and visit our website, www.sicangucdc.org to check out upcoming events and subscribe to our weekly blog with new posts every Wednesday. We'll be back next time in two weeks from today! 

Produced & edited by: Mairi Creedon

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Episode Transcript

Speaker 0 00:00:00 Sovereignty freedom. Um, I feel like everybody should be able to grow their own food and have that information, have that knowledge to be able to do it. And once we hit that step where either you can buy all of them or you're growing your own food, I feel like that's the ultimate goal important as the people to be able to do that. Speaker 1 00:00:27 Hi, <inaudible> and welcome to food revolution brought to you by the <inaudible> food sovereignty initiative. Every other week, we'll be bringing you stories of food sovereignty from community members and producers working to build a more just equitable and regenerative food system for our strangle Lakota, the breadth, our nation together, we're building tribal sovereignty through food, and we set a place at the table just for you. Join us and be a part of the food revolution. I'm petty wash day. I'm Mary Creeden, the media coordinator for the food sovereignty initiative and the producer of food revolution today on the show, you'll be hearing from three of our summer garden interns and community members, Maddie Cornelli Kachina, one star and Mikey Boyd they'll share what food sovereignty means to them. Talk about some of the experiences they've had up at the garden and discuss why they chose to come back this summer. The future of food sovereignty lies with our youth and seeing the excitement and passion. This group of interns brought to the garden this summer has left us hopeful for the years to come be sure to tune in to future episodes, to hear from the rest of the summer garden team. Speaker 0 00:01:41 My name is Maddie I'm from the mission antelope area. My parents are from here working in teacher housing. Well, I did originally apply last year, but, uh, something didn't work out. So, um, but I was really happy that they asked again this year, if I wanted to do it, and I was able to get my application in and do it again because I love working out here. Uh, I just really like putting in hard work in the morning and being outside with parents. And yeah, I like seeing all of the like vegetables grow flowers, blossom that we plant, but I also like team building aspect of it, getting everybody better throughout the summer and getting really close as a team. Oh, there's a lot of things different now. Um, there's so many things that we do now that we didn't do, but it's because the first year I was here, we were kind of building up the garden, getting it ready to be able to do all the things we do now. Speaker 0 00:02:47 Like to be able to have the chickens here, to be able to have so many things growing in the indigenous garden and having every part of the acre that we use, be useful in some type of way, a lot of things today in particular, I learned how to catch chickens and, uh, I guess transport them. And I've learned about a lot of new vegetables that I've never heard about before. Um, one thing I've really enjoyed my first year was learning about composting and, um, the whole process of it with sovereignty to me is freedom. Um, I feel like everybody should be able to grow their own food and have that information, having that knowledge to be able to do it. And once we hit that step where either you can buy all the Billy or you're growing your own food, I feel like that's like the ultimate goal for every important as a people to be able to do that. Speaker 0 00:03:52 I think one of the most important things that I've learned from this job, and it's not necessarily something that I've learned this year, but my first year here was how to work with so many people in so many different types of things we do. Like we all dig dirt and move it together. We all we had together. We all do everything together, but it's all, I was never really a team person before I started. I learned how to do that here. Well, right now I I'm still at school. Um, getting a degree in political science, but I've been thinking about going into, um, education possibly, uh, being or doing this program has definitely made me want to do something that can help my community kind of straight more straight forward than I originally thought I Speaker 1 00:05:02 Does. She know one star from antelope. I think Speaker 0 00:05:07 Just being able to help my community. It was one of the reasons. And also just, um, I like being in the garden. It's being around nature is nice way, hotter, a lot more, um, a lot more work to be done, but it's not as hard as it was the first year, because I think my body has kind of gotten used to working really hard. A lot of pressure. Virulence done a lot of hard work, definitely all the knowledge I learned up here in the garden. Um, a lot of the Lakota values are really incorporated here. Speaker 1 00:05:44 So I think those are really what will stick with me, probably going to start my own garden. Um, fresh air, uh, nature bugs Speaker 0 00:06:02 From Michigan. And I'm here doing a summer Vista internship on my third summer. I just really enjoy it. I think it's really awesome work. And I really like what we're trying to do for the community. And it's nice to have a decent paying job in the summer that also does some good stuff. We keep expanding and keep getting like new things and keep planting new things. Um, like my first summer here, it was like we just started on the tomatoes, but it was mostly into the indigenous garden. I think we had just started with the indigenous garden and now we have like chickens and all this. So it's cool. I guess like working with other people, um, generally, uh, all the jobs I've had have been very isolated by myself, but this requires a lot of communication and working with other people. So, and also just like some basic gardening stuff, the stuff that I pick up on. Speaker 0 00:06:56 So, uh, for me means independence and, uh, being able to kind of create a sustainable food systems. So self-sufficiency away from, you know, the government, if you need to. So I think it's take away that we need more stuff like this here. Um, more stuff that kind of emphasizes self sufficiency and building up the community. I think that's a good thing. So that there's, there's really good stuff going on here. Um, it's very easy to get a little bit depressed about living here sometimes with the situation, but, um, stuff like this and knowing that our community members are a lot of the people that are leading it is really an awesome thing. So if we can do this, we can do a lot more. Speaker 1 00:07:49 Yeah. Thanks for tuning in to this episode of food revolution from the <inaudible> food sovereignty initiative. Don't forget to follow us on Facebook at the <inaudible> community development corporation, Instagram and Twitter at <inaudible> CDC and visit our website, www.cdc.org to check out upcoming events and subscribe to our weekly blog with new posts every Wednesday. We'll be back next time in two weeks from today.

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